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  • CRISM
    • FRT, HRS, HRL, FRS, ATO, ATU
    • MSP, MSW, HSV, HSP, MSV
  • CTX
  • HiRISE
  • HRSC
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  • MOC
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    • VIS
    • IR
  • VIKING
Datasets Dataset - I
  • CRISM-FRT
  • CRISM-MSP
  • CTX
  • HiRISE
  • HRSC-ND
  • HRSC-BL
  • HRSC-GR
  • HRSC-RE
  • HRSC-IR
  • HRSC-S1
  • HRSC-S2
  • HRSC-P1
  • HRSC-P2
  • MOC-NA
  • MOC-WA
  • THEMIS-VIS
  • THEMIS-IR
  • VIKING
Dataset - II
  • CRISM-FRT
  • CRISM-MSP
  • CTX
  • HiRISE
  • HRSC-ND
  • HRSC-BL
  • HRSC-GR
  • HRSC-RE
  • HRSC-IR
  • HRSC-S1
  • HRSC-S2
  • HRSC-P1
  • HRSC-P2
  • MOC-NA
  • MOC-WA
  • THEMIS-VIS
  • THEMIS-IR
  • VIKING
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Multi-Temporal Database of Planetary Image Data
ASU
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Welcome

The Multi-temporal Database of Planetary Image Data is a tool to identify the spatial and temporal coverage of planetary image data from Mars. Over one million image meta datasets from several missions and intruments are integrated into our database. Overlapping image data can be searched under user-defined spatial and temporal conditions. Furthermore, the temporal context of the data can be analysed.

  • Datasets

    The data selection panel gives you access to all datasets, integrated in the database. Click on a dataset to see the data availability on the map.

  • Multi-Temporal Search

    Images can be searched in temporal and spatial relation to other images.

  • Filter

    Filter the data temporaly by the date of acquisition, seasonaly by the solar longitude or in order to the acquisition geometry.

  • Navigation

    Click on the planet for global multi-spectral, topographical or geological information. For the selection of your area of interest draw a rectangle by holding Shift + or click on the area selection tool or insert the maximum and minimum coordinates.

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Tutorial

This interactive tutorial introduces all major features of MUTED. Click on the start button to learn step by step how to identify, filter, and display multi-temporal orbital images of Mars.

  • Find images for a specific area and time:

    • 1. Explore global basemaps

    • 2. Select an area of interest using the drawing tool ()

    • 3. Select a dataset

    • 4. Filter images by time, solar longitude, or spatial resolution

    • 5. Select and explore the available images

  • Multi-temporal Search: Find images in spatial and temporal relationship to other images:

    • 1. Open multi-temporal search menu

    • 2. Select overlapping datasets

    • 3. Define time interval between images (e.g., one hour)

    • 4. Explore image overlaps

    • 5. Select and view overlapping images

  • CASSIS
  • CRISM
  • CTX
  • HIRISE
  • HRSC
  • MOC
  • THEMIS
  • VIKING
  • Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System

    ESA's Exo-Mars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) mission reached Mars in October 2016. The Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) onboard of TGO is a high-resolution color stereo camera with a spatial resolution of 4.5 m per pixel for building accurate digital elevation models of the martian surface. Images will be included into MUTED as soon as they are available.

    Thomas N. et al. (2017) EPSC 2014, 9, 100.

  • Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer of Mars

    In 2005, after five months of aerobraking, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) entered its final orbit around Mars. MRO has three optical instruments to characterize the geology and mineralogy of the surface of Mars at high spatial and spectral resolution. High-resolution spectral observations are provided by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer of Mars (CRISM) operated in three observing modes. In multispectral mapping mode, a subset of data is collected at 72 wavelengths with a spatial resolution of 100 and 200 m per pixel. After five martian years of operation, observations cover more than 80% of surface of Mars at multiple visible and infrared parts of the spectrum. In targeted mode, images at a spectral range from 362 nm to 3920 nm (6.55 nm/channel) with a spatial resolution of 20 m per pixel are acquired.

    Murchie S. et al. (2007) JGR 112, E05S03.

  • Context Camera

    In 2005, after five months of aerobraking, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) entered its final orbit around Mars. MRO has three optical instruments to characterize the geology and mineralogy of the surface of Mars at high spatial and spectral resolution. The Context Camera (CTX) acquires 30 km wide and more than 40 km long context images with a spatial resolution of ~6 m per pixel. Due to the large areal coverage, in early 2017, 99% of the planet is covered after almost six martian years of operation.

    Malin M. C. et al. (2007) JGR 112, E05S04.

  • High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment

    In 2005, after five months of aerobraking, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) entered its final orbit around Mars. MRO has three optical instruments to characterize the geology and mineralogy of the surface of Mars at high spatial and spectral resolution. The currently highest available orbital image resolution of 0.25–0.5 m per pixel is achieved by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) (McEwen et al., 2007). Focusing on detailed geomorphology and stratigraphy of key locales, high-resolution images cover 2.4% of the martian surface after five martian years of operation.

    McEwen A. et al. (2007) JGR 112, E05S02.

  • High Resolution Stereo Camera

    ESA's Mars Express (MEX) reached Mars in 2003. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board of MEX images the surface of Mars in four colors and five different phase angles (up to 18.9°) at a spatial resolution of 12.5 m per pixel. This configuration allows the derivation of digital terrain models with a grid size of up to 50 m and a height accuracy of 10 m. Due to the elliptical orbit, the spatial resolution depends on the respective distance from the surface of Mars. After ten Earth years of operation, ~70% of the surface are covered by panchromatic images with a spatial resolution better than 20 m per pixel and ~90% with a spatial resolution better than 100 m per pixel.

    Jaumann R. et al. (2007) PSS 55, 928–952.

    HRSC image of Kasei Valles - Sacra Fossae.

  • Mars Orbiter Camera

    Almost ten martian years after the Viking program, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) reached Mars in 1997. Using two camera systems, more than 360,000 images were acquired over the following five martian years. Focusing on seasonal phenomena in the atmosphere and on the surface of Mars, the Mars Orbiter Camera Wide Angle (MOC-WA) acquired images at a spatial resolution of 240 m per pixel to 7.5 km per pixel. The Mars Orbiter Camera Narrow Angle (MOC-NA) achieved a global coverage of 5.45% with high-resolution images at a spatial resolution of 1.5 to 12 m per pixel.

    Malin M. C. et al. (2001) JGR, 106, 23,429–23,570.

  • Thermal Emission Imaging Instrument

    Mars Odyssey (MO) entered the martian orbit in 2001. MO is still active and the longest surviving orbiter in Mars exploration. Its Thermal Emission Imaging Instrument (THEMIS) consist of two instruments observing the surface of Mars at the visible and near-infrared part of the spectrum. The THEMIS-VIS camera acquires images with a spatial resolution of 18 m per pixel and covered more than 60% of the planet after eight martian years of operation. Infrared images from the THEMIS-IR spectrometer are typically more than 600 km long and cover a wavelength range of 6.7–14.8 μm at a spatial resolution of 100 m per pixel. Using infrared observations, Edwards et al. (2011) produced a global day- and nighttime mosaic with a spatial resolution of ~100 m per pixel at the equator.

    Christensen P. R. et al. (2004) SSR 110, 85–130.

  • Viking Orbiter

    A first comprehensive view of the surface of Mars was achieved by the two Viking Orbiters. The orbiters reached Mars ~50 days apart in 1976. In the following two and a half martian years more than 47,000 images with a spatial resolution between seven and several hundred meters per pixel were collected. On this basis, the first global mosaic of Mars with a pixel resolution of 231m at the equator was created (Kirk et al., 1999; Archinal et al., 2003). Half of the images taken by the Viking Orbiter have a spatial resolution of 100 m per pixel and better.

    Carr M. H. et al. (1972) Icarus 16, 1, 17-33.

Support

Questions or Suggestions? We welcome any feedback you have on MUTED. If there are additional features or datasets you would like to see, let us know: muted.info@uni-muenster.de

Coordination

Prof. Dr. Harald Hiesinger

PD. Dr. Dennis Reiss

Dr. Jan Raack

Thomas Heyer

Institut für Planetologie

Reference

When using MUTED in research work, we encourage you to cite following reference in publications or presentations:

Heyer et al. (2018) PSS 159, 56-65.

Scientific applications of the multi-temporal search of planetary image data based on a previous version of MUTED are presented by:

Erkeling et al. (2016) PSS 125, 43-61.